Sips from the Sipp

Black history & heritage from the Utica Institute Museum.

About the show

Sips from the Sipp focusing on the history of Southern Black Education and specifically the Utica Institute, a rural school in Mississippi. Hosted by Jean Greene, co-director of the Utica Institute Museum, we cover the history and heritage of our HBCU.

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Episodes

  • Episode 17: Black Man's Burden, Chapter 9

    February 22nd, 2024  |  25 mins 59 secs

    A reading of William Holtzclaw's autobiography, Black Man's Burden. Chapter 7. William Holtzclaw was the founder of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, a "Little Tuskegee" in rural Utica, Mississippi. His book, the first published by an African American in Mississippi, recounts his journey in establishing the school.

    Chapter 9 recounts William H. Holtzclaw's early efforts to promote Utica Institute, including a quartet tour and encounters with unexpected Southern support. The chapter also addresses challenges in providing quality education, the role of external benefactors, and the political context marked by Governor James K. Vardaman's controversial stance on race and education.

  • Episode 18: Dr. Bobby G. Cooper - Black Man's Burden ch. 9 Discussion

    February 29th, 2024  |  26 mins 44 secs

    Jean & Dr. Bobby G. Cooper discuss Chapter 9 of "The Black Man's Burden," focusing on William H. Holtzclaw's experiences with the Utica Jubilee Singers during the early 1900s. The conversation highlights the group's humble beginnings, challenges faced during tours, and their evolution into ambassadors of goodwill for Black education, culminating in Dr. Cooper's ongoing efforts to preserve and revitalize the Utica Jubilee Singers' legacy with an upcoming recording project.

  • Episode 19: Black Man's Burden, Chapter 10

    March 7th, 2024  |  14 mins 19 secs

    A reading of William Holtzclaw's autobiography, Black Man's Burden. Chapter 10. William Holtzclaw was the founder of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, a "Little Tuskegee" in rural Utica, Mississippi. His book, the first published by an African American in Mississippi, recounts his journey in establishing the school.

    In Chapter 10 of "The Black Man's Burden," William H. Holtzclaw describes the growth of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute and its community outreach efforts, including the "Teachers' Extension Movement." Through organized initiatives and annual Negro Farmers' Conferences, the institute aims to uplift the community by promoting land ownership, educational improvement, and practical knowledge-sharing, fostering a sense of citizenship among the local population.

  • Episode 20: Dr. Shirley Hopkins Davis - Black Man's Burden ch. 10 Discussion

    March 14th, 2024  |  37 mins 10 secs

    In this episode, Jean Greene and Dr. Shirley Hopkins Davis, Dean Emeritus of Hinds Community College Utica Campus, discuss Chapter 10 of Holtzclaw's autobiography, "Black Man's Burden." They focus on Holtzclaw's Teacher's Extension Movement and its implications for today. Dr. Davis highlights the relevance of Holtzclaw's teachings in building communities, promoting education, and addressing issues like debt and race relations. Holtzclaw's emphasis on respect, humanity, and sustainability is emphasized, illustrating the enduring significance of his ideas.

  • Episode 21: Black Man's Burden, Chapter 11

    March 21st, 2024  |  16 mins 3 secs

    A reading of William Holtzclaw's autobiography, Black Man's Burden. Chapter 11. William Holtzclaw was the founder of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, a "Little Tuskegee" in rural Utica, Mississippi. His book, the first published by an African American in Mississippi, recounts his journey in establishing the school.

    The chapter discusses the establishment of the Black Belt Improvement Society, later reorganized as the Black Belt Improvement Company, by William H. Holtzclaw, aiming to uplift African American communities through economic and social progress. Through testimonials and newspaper endorsements, it highlights the society's success in guiding individuals out of debt, fostering economic independence, and gaining recognition for its positive impact on the community.

  • Episode 22: Dr. Shirley Hopkins Davis - Black Man's Burden ch. 11 Discussion

    March 28th, 2024  |  34 mins 33 secs

    Dr. Shirley Hopkins Davis, Dean Emeritus of Hinds Community College Utica Campus, returns to discuss Chapter 11 of Holtzclaw's autobiography, "Black Man's Burden." Jean and Dr. Davis highlight Holtzclaw's focus on community empowerment through the Black Belt Improvement Society. By emphasizing trust-building, economic investment, and leading by example, Holtzclaw aimed to uplift individuals and communities, demonstrating the transformative power of faith, perseverance, and collective action.

  • Episode 23: Black Man's Burden, Chapter 12

    April 4th, 2024  |  30 mins 57 secs

    A reading of William Holtzclaw's autobiography, Black Man's Burden. Chapter 12. William Holtzclaw was the founder of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, a "Little Tuskegee" in rural Utica, Mississippi. His book, the first published by an African American in Mississippi, recounts his journey in establishing the school.

    The chapter illustrates Utica's efforts in community empowerment, highlighted by Dr. Washington's invitation to former graduates and fundraising endeavors for land expansion, despite setbacks. Through anecdotes of progress and reflections on racial tensions, William Holtzclaw navigates the complexities of race relations in the South, emphasizing the importance of education and collective action in addressing social and economic challenges.

  • Episode 24: Dr. Linda Laws - Black Man's Burden ch. 12 Discussion

    April 11th, 2024  |  41 mins 15 secs

    In this episode of Sips from the Sipp, long-time Utica area educator Dr. Linda Laws discusses Chapter 12 of William Holtzclaw's book, "Black Man's Burden" with Jean Greene. They explore themes of education, land ownership, and racial dynamics in the early 20th century, highlighting the enduring relevance of issues such as hard work, perseverance, and racial prejudice in contemporary society.

  • Episode 25: Black Man's Burden, Chapter 13

    April 18th, 2024  |  17 mins 4 secs

    A reading of William Holtzclaw's autobiography, Black Man's Burden. Chapter 13. William Holtzclaw was the founder of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, a "Little Tuskegee" in rural Utica, Mississippi. His book, the first published by an African American in Mississippi, recounts his journey in establishing the school.

    Chapter 13 recounts the challenges faced by Mr. Holtzclaw in acquiring land for a school near Utica. Despite initial progress, opposition from white residents surfaced, threatening the deal. Facing pressure from both sides, Dr. Hoitzcraw navigated financial obstacles and personal safety concerns, ultimately securing the land through perseverance, community support, and unexpected acts of generosity, ensuring the school's continued growth and development.

  • Episode 26: Ms. Cassandra Ellis - Black Man's Burden ch. 13

    April 25th, 2024  |  18 mins 44 secs

    In the discussion of Chapter 13 of "Black Man's Burden," Utica alumna Cassandra Ellis highlights Holtzclaw's perseverance and ability to garner support from both black and white communities in his pursuit of educational advancement. Emphasizing active listening and mutual support, Ellis reflects on the enduring relevance of Holtzclaw's story for fostering community engagement and uplifting marginalized students.

  • Episode 27: Black Man's Burden, Chapter 14

    May 2nd, 2024  |  14 mins 7 secs

    A reading of William Holtzclaw's autobiography, Black Man's Burden. Chapter 14. William Holtzclaw was the founder of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, a "Little Tuskegee" in rural Utica, Mississippi. His book, the first published by an African American in Mississippi, recounts his journey in establishing the school.

    In Chapter 14 of "Black Man's Burden," William Holtzclaw recounts incidents highlighting the fear among colored people regarding interactions with white citizens. Despite initial resistance from his trustees and colored community, Holtzclaw successfully arranged for Booker T. Washington to visit Utica in 1908, ultimately receiving overwhelming support from both white and black residents, demonstrating the transformative impact of Washington's visit.

  • Episode 28: Mrs. Brenda Baker Jones - Black Man's Burden ch. 14 Discussion

    May 9th, 2024  |  22 mins 4 secs

    In this episode, Jean Greene interviews Brenda Baker Jones about her experiences at the Utica campus, highlighting her innovative teaching methods, such as organizing annual student weddings as final exams. They discuss the significance of Booker T. Washington's visit to Utica, reflecting on the historical context of racial tensions and the importance of understanding and preserving the campus's legacy for future generations.

  • Episode 29: Black Man's Burden, Chapter 15

    May 16th, 2024  |  17 mins 53 secs

    A reading of William Holtzclaw's autobiography, Black Man's Burden. Chapter 15. William Holtzclaw was the founder of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, a "Little Tuskegee" in rural Utica, Mississippi. His book, the first published by an African American in Mississippi, recounts his journey in establishing the school.

    The chapter delves into the roots of fear among Black individuals towards Whites, often fueled by rumors and the terrorizing activities of groups like the White Caps, eventually quelled by governmental intervention. Additionally, it discusses efforts to assist Black farmers in adapting to agricultural challenges like the boll-weevil through initiatives such as farmers' conferences and practical advice dissemination via newspapers, aiming to promote self-reliance and resilience in the face of adversity.